/ Webcalling

6 Ways To Get More Calls From Your Website

How do you get more customers to call you?

Does your business rely on inbound calls to generate revenues?

If so, you know how important it is to keep the phone ringing. If you benefit from upselling, and establishing a human connection with your customers, the phone is the best way to sell.

Your website is your primary marketing tool. But how do you get people to call you when they visit your website?

1. Create a Need

This is the most important aspect. This is not a tactic, rather a fundamental principle. It doesn't matter how good your sales people are on the phone if your customers have no desire to call you.

Effective messaging differs from business to business, but it's about conveying your core value proposition. You also need to articulate why the customer should call you, rather than solving their problem by themselves online.

A phone call is a fundamentally a connection between two people. It helps if your customer thinks they are phoning you to talk to a knowledgable human. Try showing pictures or videos of your agents. Tell them something interesting about you. Are you saying “Call our Agents”, or “Chat with our dedicated Travel Experts”? These things make a difference.

While this may seem obvious, many companies miss this mark on this point. Consistently reinforce this messaging at key points of the journey, especially at areas of drop-off.

Once the customer has a need, you must make it easy for your customer to actually call you:

2. Display Phone Number

Most people will look for a telephone number if they want to call you. Therefore, it makes sense to make your phone number visible and prominent, at all points of your website. As a minimum, you can simply add your number to your website header or footer. Needless to say, this placement needs to work just as well regardless of window size and device type, includes mobiles and tablets. Your number should be pushed consistently across all points of your site.

If you have an online booking process, or a complex website, you should be looking to add popups and place your number at strategic points of your customer journey. At each point, make it clear to label who the number relates to, and why the customer should call them.

If you have multiple phone numbers, they should be listed out. Customers would rather read and choose from a list of options, than have to navigate an IVR. If you have paid for a free phone number, let your customers know this!

3. Call Back Forms

Call back forms provide customers with an option for you to call them back at a later time. If the customer is waiting in a queue with you (uh oh!), or they would preferred to be called back later, this is a sensible option to offer. As a bonus, you get the customer’s details and maybe some context as to why they wanted to call you. These can be simple HTML forms, or sophisticated solutions that will work with your outbound dialling software.

However, while they may be in a mood to call at that point, will that still be true later? Customers can change their minds quickly. Surely it would be better if they could call you right then and there, while they are on your website and interested in your product or service.

Call back forms definitely have their place, but they will not actively drive people to call you.

4. Call Tracking

Google Analytics and other tools provide invaluable tools for understanding how your customers interact with your website. Call tracking software helps you bridge the gap between the digital world and the world of inbound calling.

It helps you to be intelligent with how and where you place your phone number around your website. In an age when marketers are increasingly data driven, knowing where your callers have contacted you from is vital.

5. Live Chat

Live chat has exploded in popularity because customers love being one click away from you, and being able to interact with you while they are on your website/app.

However, as a communication channel, it is not as effective as a phone call for upselling, dealing with complex enquiries and creating trust with your customers.

Chat is generally good for dealing with trivial issues, so it may be worth experimenting to see what sorts of enquiries you get through live chat, and to see if is as effective as phone calls for selling.

Annoyingly, if the customer calls you after a chat session, they’ll probably have to repeat everything they just typed out to the live chat agent…

6. Webcalling / Click-to-Call

Webcalling, also known as click-to-call, lets your customers call you from within your website. Instantly. No need for a phone, or to key in a number. Just click a button and start a call!

Webcalling is a new customer contact method that allows free, convenient calls for your customers when they are on your website. Since the click-to-call can be initiated from a button, you can embed it anywhere on your website, and even make rules about which number the button will ring. As a company you can use your existing phones. You can even use it with live chat, to get the best of both worlds.

There are many other advantages to webcalling, that vary depending on your business. But crucially, webcalling removes barriers to calling, and is generally the most suitable tool for getting website visitors to call you.

All of the above are worth incorporating into your website. Each have a different effect. The key point here is that you need to be constantly iterating, and experimenting with new tactics. Set a benchmark of monthly call volumes, introduce a new technique, and measure its success.

Have we missed any key points? If so, let us know at info@talkative.uk